WALLY'S BLOG

A diary of a retired South African Water Ranger.

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

The Water Thick-knee’s eggs no longer in the nest


17 Jan 2009

  • The Water Thick-knee’s (Water Dikkop) eggs are gone.

I suspect that it may be due to the activity at the fishing site, where she had her nest.

I still see the birds in the area.



My other blog: http://www.wally.iblog.co.za/

My new photo album:


Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Brown -throated Martins

08-01-2009

Brown-throated Martins

Some Brown-throated Martins were nesting near the No 4 fishing site. Their nests are little holes in the sand bank.

Before going home in the evening, I have to check that everyone is gone so that I can lock the gates. I use this opportunity to check for fishing line and other debris that can harm the animals or birds, left behind by the day visitors, before locking the area for the night.

The martins were flying overhead and I felt something was amiss. As I surveyed the nest holes, I noticed that they were blocked by fresh mud. I opened the holes, as I suspected the children blocked them to trap the birds.

The next day the birds were using their nesting tunnels again.

Here is a link to some photographs sent to Google under the label of Brown-throated Martins. Note the Sand Martins have a white throat.

The Waterranger's blog

My bird photo album:

Back to the top:

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

12-01-2009 bird activity

12-01-2009

  • An African Marsh-Harrier was sweeping low over the reeds in the South Pan and disturbed a flock of about 200 Weavers.

  • About 30-40 Swift Terns arrived.

  • I went to check on the Kittlitz's Plover. The nest was empty and there was no sign to indicate what happened to the eggs. I removed the barrier placed there to protect them.

Picture Links:

Marsh Harrier

Weaver

Kittlitz's Plover

My old blog: http://www.wally.iblog.co.za/

My bird photo album: http://picasaweb.google.com/omdiebos/WallySBlog?authkey=0VT7Mn3IZkw#

Back to the top: http://waterranger.blogspot.com/


Bird Sighting 8-01-2009

50 lesser flamingo's

Kittlitz's Plover Nest



6-01-2009
The Kittlitz's Plover made nest right next to the path at the bird-hide block.
She covered the eggs so well that it was nearly impossible to see them.
I hope the eggs will hatch.
The nest is at a very vulnerable spot, as the service vehicles sometimes use that area.
I cordoned the site off.

My old blog: http://www.wally.iblog.co.za/

My bird photo album: http://picasaweb.google.com/omdiebos/WallySBlog?authkey=0VT7Mn3IZkw#

Back to the top: http://waterranger.blogspot.com/

Kittlitz’s Plover 5-01-2009



I spotted a Kittlitz’s Plover in the bird-hide block




My old blog: http://www.wally.iblog.co.za/

My bird photo album: http://picasaweb.google.com/omdiebos/WallySBlog?authkey=0VT7Mn3IZkw#

Back to the top: http://waterranger.blogspot.com/

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Death's-head Hawkmoth


Death's-head Hawkmoth
(4 January 2009)

Found in the boom-gate at Rietvlei. It got it's name because of the impression of a scull on its back.

The Death's-head Hawkmoth is known to suck honey from beehives and sometimes squeak when handled.

Monday, January 12, 2009

Mole Behaviour


3-1-2009

A mole gnawed into one of the club's water connections. This plastic is as hard as iron.

My old blog: http://www.wally.iblog.co.za/

My bird photo album: http://picasaweb.google.com/omdiebos/WallySBlog?authkey=0VT7Mn3IZkw#

Back to the top: http://waterranger.blogspot.com/

Bird Activity 2 January 2009


2 December 2009

Bird activity at Rietvlei:

  • Cape Francolin with 8 chicks

  • Helmeted Guineafowl with 15 chicks.

  • The White-throated Swallows are breeding again.

Photograph: White-throated Swallows
Links to photographs of :
Helmeted Guineafowl
Cape Francolin


My old blog: http://www.wally.iblog.co.za/

My bird photo album: http://picasaweb.google.com/omdiebos/WallySBlog?authkey=0VT7Mn3IZkw#

Back to the top: http://waterranger.blogspot.com/

Saturday, January 10, 2009

Guineafowl attacking


1 December 2009

This evening, before leaving for home, I was checking the fishing sites for nylon left behind by the fishermen, when I saw a Helmeted Guineafowl attacking something. At closer inspection, I saw a mole lying on it's back while the bird is fiercely pecking it.

My approach disturbed the bird and the poor mole scurried away and instantly burrowed into an old mole mound. The aggressiveness of the birds is due to them having chicks.

Links:

  • The photo above is of a Guineafowl chick

Fish-Eagles

Fish-Eagles
Birds eye view from the island at Rietvlei. Photogrash taken 2002